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April 2021

2021 Connected Home

2021 marks the third year of Hub’s Media+Entertainment tracking study. As in previous years, the Connected Home report will provide a broad look at entertainment technology in the home, as well as intentions to purchase new media tech and how people approach those purchases.

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The past year was like no other experienced in recent decades. While the pandemic constrained many businesses, much of the media business saw increases as people were forced to forgo outside activities and remain home. Consumers invested in not only content services but in new media technology to serve the new reality – smart TVs and streaming media players for household viewing, and computers, monitors, and smartphones for working at home.

This behavior almost certainly accelerated technology investments that would have happened eventually; but which technologies were the winners and which got left behind?

2021 marks the third year of Hub’s Media+Entertainment tracking study. As in previous years, the Connected Home report will provide a broad look at entertainment technology in the home, as well as intentions to purchase new media tech and how people approach those purchases. Tracked against 2019 and 2020 data, our data will reveal what devices are trending hot and cold in the pandemic-impacted media technology market.

This study will continue to provide content producers and distributors with insights that will help them better understand the marketplace and better inform strategy and investment decisions.

The study is conducted among 5,000 U.S. consumers age 16-74.

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March 2021

2021 Predicting the Pandemic

Our 2021 waves of pandemic research will track how consumers have modified their behaviors in the face of these shifts in entertainment delivery and will explore what the “new normal” will look like once the public health crisis has eased.

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The first weeks of 2021 have seen an abundance of new COVID-related developments. New cases, hospitalizations, and deaths have continued their post-Thanksgiving surge at the beginning of the year, new, more contagious strains of the virus have begun making inroads in the US, and the new presidential administration has promised significant changes to the way the country manages the crisis. And while recently introduced vaccines have raised hopes that we’ll finally see a light at the end of the tunnel, many have criticized what they consider to be a slow rollout of vaccinations to date.

As the public health situation continues to evolve, so does the TV and entertainment landscape. HBO Max and Disney have shifted their movie distribution strategy toward streaming, releasing first-run, blockbuster films on their online platforms at the same time as (or instead of) in theaters. Netflix has also announced that it will be releasing a brand-new movie every week in 2021. Other streaming platforms have ramped up their original content offerings, AVODs continue to be a popular source of free, nostalgia viewing, and live TV services continue to look for ways to adapt their live sports, competition, and talk show formats.

As was the case in 2020, our 2021 waves of pandemic research will track how consumers have modified their behaviors in the face of these shifts in entertainment delivery and will explore what the “new normal” will look like once the public health crisis has eased.

The study is conducted among 3,008 U.S. consumers age 14-74 who watch a minimum of 1 hour of TV per week.

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February 2021

2021 Evolution of Video Branding

Hub’s Evolution of Video Branding study tracks awareness, understanding, and perceptions of the full range of top players across the TV ecosystem—including both TV distribution platforms and TV networks. The study also examines the impact of these brand perceptions on consumers’ service use and show viewing decisions.

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First launched in 2016, Hub’s Evolution of Video Branding study tracks awareness, understanding, and perceptions of the full range of top players across the TV ecosystem—including both TV distribution platforms and TV networks. The study also examines the impact of these brand perceptions on consumers’ service use and show viewing decisions.

It’s safe to say that the TV brand landscape looks radically different today from how it looked only six years ago, when HBO became the first TV network to launch a direct-to-consumer streaming service. That service helped accelerate an important shift that had already begun with the introduction of Netflix, Amazon, and Netflix: the shift from a single platform for accessing one’s favorite TV shows, to the availability of multiple platforms, each with its own exclusive rights to content.

Although the sudden availability of disaggregated content was seen as a boon by many TV consumers (who relished the idea of paying for only the networks they want), the rapid growth of SVODs and direct-to-consumer platforms made it that much more difficult for viewers to locate one’s favorite shows or to discover new ones (where do I go to find show X again?). And those tasks are not likely to get much easier, as viewers must now begin to learn which individual networks and which individual shows are associated with new streaming services offered by media conglomerates (e.g., Peacock, Discovery+, Paramount+).

The 2021 wave of Hub’s Evolution of Video Branding study will examine the impact of these brand developments on consumers’ platform and viewing decisions—and explore how that impact has changed over time.

The study is conducted among 1,606 U.S. consumers age 16-74 who watch a minimum of 1 hour of TV per week.

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January 2021

2020 5G

This new report will explore how much consumers know about 5G at this early stage, consumers’ interest in 5G’s possible applications and use cases, and how 5G might impact legacy providers of broadband or bundled telecom services.

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5G: in the near term, is it high-speed or hype? A broad marketing push for 5G originally planned by several brands for early 2020 was delayed by the pandemic. Now, with the new, just-announced 5G-capable iPhone 12 rolling out in October and November, we know “5G” will come to forefront. But how much do consumers really know about 5G?

5G wireless includes not only phones but home broadband nodes. 5G holds the potential of further transforming our connected world by being the ultimate cord-cutting technology—a further threat to cable broadband service. No wires for TV or home broadband are needed at all, with lightning fast speeds whether the user is stationary at home or mobile in a car. 5G is also a critical component in the evolution of the smart home and smart devices like self-driving cars.

This new report will explore how much consumers know about 5G at this early stage, consumers’ interest in 5G’s possible applications and use cases, and how 5G might impact legacy providers of broadband or bundled telecom services.

The study is conducted among 2,502 U.S. consumers age 16-74.

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January 2021

2020 Video Redefined

“Video Redefined” is our annual deep-dive into how consumers are using these non-TV forms of video content, the appeal of new entrants into the market, and importantly, the impact of time spent with these new content sources on traditional TV viewing. The study will also look at trends in new video consumption and attitudes since our our 2019 wave of “Video Redefined” research.

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From the time the COVID pandemic first forced Americans to spend more time at home, Hub has been carefully tracking not just the impact on TV viewing behaviors, but on entertainment and leisure habits generally.

It’s no secret that COVID has disrupted virtually every aspect of people’s normal leisure existence. It’s resulted not just in people spending more time at home, but also in changes to how some of the most popular TV content is presented (think sports and talk shows), new models for how movies are distributed, delays in TV premieres, live events cancelled or moved online, and of course limited opportunities for spending quality, face-to-face time with friends and extended family.

As consumers continue to look for ways to stay sane during this stressful time, we’ve been tracking a number of fundamental shifts in how they’re consuming entertainment, including more reliance on streaming TV platforms (SVODs and AVODs), a greater likelihood to choose nostalgic comfort viewing, and an increased willingness to pay for first-run movies to watch from the comfort of one’s home.

But without some of the TV options they’re accustomed to, many consumers are venturing out beyond the traditional TV horizon and relying more and more on other forms of content, from YouTube influencer and TikTok videos, to professionally produced short form series to livestreamed performances, to podcasts and eSports, and to live “story” videos on platforms like Facebook and Instagram.

“Video Redefined” is our annual deep-dive into how consumers are using these non-TV forms of video content, the appeal of new entrants into the market, and importantly, the impact of time spent with these new content sources on traditional TV viewing. The study will also look at trends in new video consumption and attitudes since our our 2019 wave of “Video Redefined” research.

The study is conducted among 1,907 U.S. consumers age 13-74 who watch a minimum of 1 hour of TV per week.

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